Item #54440 THE PROCLAMATION OF ANDREW JACKSON, PRESIDENT, TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. NULLIFICATION, Andrew Jackson.

THE PROCLAMATION OF ANDREW JACKSON, PRESIDENT, TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

NY: Printed by E. Conrad, City of New York, [1832]. First edition. Broadside 19 1/2 x 28 inch., printed on silk. There are small holes, evenly spaced along the edges of the margins from a previous mounting, likely on a frame. The edges of the silk are left unfinished and loose. Item #54440

One of the most important assertions of the supremacy of federal over state law in the early history of the nation, this is Jackson's famous proclamation in which he denounced nullification as treason and told the people of South Carolina in no uncertain terms that he proposed to enforce the laws of the United States. On Nov. 25, 1832, South Carolina 's state legislature passed the Ordinance of Nullification. It declared that the tariff acts of 1828 and 1832 were in violation of the Constitution of the United States, and therefore null, void, and not binding on the State of South Carolina or her citizens. President Jackson responded by issuing this proclamation on Dec. 10, 1832. In it, he summarizes the Ordinance of Nullification, argues that it is an act of treason, and declares that he will enforce the laws of the United States and use force to do so. Congress supported the President's authority to use the military in South Carolina by passing the Force Act of March 2, 1833. At the same time, a compromise tariff was negotiated between Jackson's administration and South Carolina Unionists. It was passed by Congress on the same day as the Force Act. This compromised tariff mollified South Carolinians, who decided to avoid secession and war by repealing the Ordinance of Nullification on March 11, 1833. In a final symbolic defense of states rights, however, the South Carolina convention passed a new ordinance declaring the Force Act (now irrelevant) null and void.
Sabin 35352 incorrectly dates the printing as Dec. 10, 1833. He does however accurately state "A few copies were printed on satin, with ornamental borders." Collins in THREADS OF HISTORY #79 pictures a Boston printing, slightly smaller, with the same ornamental border but lacking the eagle at the top center. It is further known that a Philadelphia printing of 1833 was issued.

Price: $1,500.00

See all items by ,